Targets of Disinformation

Who gets targeted for disinformation, harassment, scams, or doxxing? What societal effects can we observe when that targeting is based on individual and group identity? Contemporary online harassment and other techniques of subjugation fit into historical patterns of oppression. This collection encompasses identity-based targeting, networked harassment, and other forms of online abuse. 

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This Live Research Review is scheduled for publication in the coming months. In the meantime, you can find articles related to this topic in our Citation Library.

Latest News on Targets of Disinformation

The news: Facebook has revealed a huge jump in images of child sex abuse uploaded to the website: 11.6 million pieces of content from July to September this year, versus 6.9 million from April to June. However, it proactively detects and removes over 99% of all such images, and the large increase is due to […]

Political parties are trying to find ways to use WhatsApp as a campaign tool in the general election, but Britons’ reluctance to join group chats involving strangers is hindering the effort. The pro-Labour campaign group Momentum is urging supporters to sign up to its WhatsApp broadcast service to receive messages to forward to their friends, […]

The 2020 US Census is only five months away. This nationwide population count, which takes place every 10 years, determines everything from Social Security payouts to how the government spends money on schools and hospitals to where businesses open new stores—and everyone is worried about attempts to skew the count.  Some groups, like young children, […]

Donald Trump has made the demonization of Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, a key element of his 2020 re-election strategy. But the targeting of Ms. Omar and her fellow Democrat and Muslim member of Congress, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, started as soon as they became candidates. We published a study this week that found […]

Islamic State militants have been posting short propaganda videos to TikTok, the social network known for lighthearted content popular with teenagers. The videos—since removed, in line with the app’s policy—featured corpses paraded through streets, Islamic State fighters with guns, and women who call themselves “jihadist and proud.” Many were set to Islamic State songs. Some […]

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