Credibility and Trust

Policymakers, scientists, and journalists have worried for years about declining public trust in their institutions. Are new technologies like social media contributing to this decline, or are they convenient scapegoats for broader forces in society? We discuss research on how  populist politics and other anti-elite, anti-institutional movements are intersecting with declining public trust and the rise of alternative epistemologies. 

Live Research Review

Forthcoming

This Live Research Review is scheduled for publication in the coming months. In the meantime, you can find articles related to this topic in our Citation Library.

Teaching & Learning

Explore course modules, handouts, teaching tools and syllabi about dis- and misinformation.

Latest News on Credibility and Trust

By now, you may have heard that Trump’s Department of Justice secretly seized the phone records of journalists working for The New York Times, CNN, and The Washington Post, in the hopes of revealing their sources and stopping leaks to the press. But the NYT is now reporting that Trump didn’t stop at journalists — […]

Nigeria’s telecom companies had officially blocked Twitter, and the attorney general vowed to prosecute those who found a way to use it, but Editi Effiong kept posting. “Silence is the enemy,” he tweeted Sunday to his 139,000 followers. The marketing executive in the country’s commercial capital, Lagos, understood the risk. This was no anonymous protest, […]

After a young Associated Press journalist lost her job last month following online attacks, On the Media considers how bad faith campaigns against the media have become an effective weapon for the far right. Plus, should we cancel the word “cancel”? One journalist argues, yes, and one academic says, no. Plus, the origins of “cancelled” in […]

Last week, a report from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism found that citizens in eight countries still largely rely on the mainstream news media for accurate information about COVID-19. It also found a correlation between those who use news outlets to get information about the ongoing vaccination campaigns and lower susceptibility to […]

Omar Neal had every reason to be skeptical. Here in Tuskegee, Alabama, where roadways are dotted with signs that read “Vaccinate Me. Stop the Spread”, the history of racist medical abuse weighs heavily. For four decades, between 1932 and 1972, the US government sponsored a biomedical study coercing 600 Black men, all sharecroppers, into a […]

Featured Scholars

Executive Director of First Draft News
Assistant Professor of Political Science at Syracuse University, Senior Research Associate at the Campbell Public Affairs Institute
Associate Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
University of Kansas