Citation

The CIA’s Black Ops: Covert Action, Foreign Policy, and Democracy

Author:
Nutter, John Jacob
Year:
2009

Since 1947, the Central Intelligence Agency has secretly worked to subvert foreign powers and even overthrow enemy governments to further United States influence abroad. The vast array of CIA black ops (operations)–including covert acts against Saddam Hussein and international terrorists, secret Afghan missions, the overthrow of Guatemalan leaders, assassination plots against Castro and others, domestic and foreign narcotics conspiracies, underground Mafia relations, and even controversial plans to dupe top U.S. officials-has stretched its influence far beyond its original purpose.A member of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers, Dr. John Jacob Nutter reveals that the U.S. has become too enamored with covert action; that black ops have become U.S. foreign policy; and that the CIA has developed into a policy maker, dangerously independent of the government that created it. Nutter explains the many and varied types of covert action-subsidies, graymail, propaganda, psychological and economic warfare, military support, paramilitary operations, coups d’etat, and assassinations-and provides detailed examples of success and failure undertaken in the name of national security.Unusual and exclusive, The CIA’s Black Ops is a courageous and unprecedented declassification of foreign exploits and domestic secrets, covering clandestine activities from the birth of special operations to today’s underground actions–many operations so covert that government officials don’t know (or don’t want to know) they are taking place.A well-recognized expert on terrorism and covert operations, John Jacob Nutter is a historical researcher and former assistant professor at Michigan State University, specializing in covert action, international politics, and guerrilla warfare. He has appeared on numerous news programs including National Public Radio and CNN.