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The Answer to Facebook, Twitter and YouTube’s Harassment and Fake News Problems? Transparency | CNET

By Ian Sherr
August 16, 2018

Ian Sherr argues for radical transparency from tech platforms when it comes to banning content: publicly open, easily searchable data on all enforcement actions. While he acknowledges that this may be challenging and introduce new problems, he says that it will help the public understand what tech companies are up to–and also potentially protect them from accusations of bias.

That’s why I think it’s time for Mark ZuckerbergJack Dorsey and Susan Wojcicki, the CEOs of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to share with us, publicly and openly, the details every time something’s taken down from their sites and why.

When Facebook pulls down a terrorist ad, put information about it in a publicly accessible database so we all know it happened, and what rule it violated.

When Twitter bans an account, like when it banned the conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos after he inspired a hate mob against the comedian Leslie Jones, put the case file up for all to see.

When YouTube pulls down a video, leave up an image for when people click on the link that not only says the video violated YouTube’s policies, but also what part of the video had run afoul of which policy.

Source: The Answer to Facebook, Twitter and YouTube’s Harassment and Fake News Problems? Transparency | CNET

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